Michigan Backyard Paradise



mapleleaf arrowhead

Maple-leaved Arrowhead Viburnum Acerifolium

Native to the eastern part of the U.S., this species of viburnum is often mistaken for young maple trees growing on the forest floor. What distinguishes it are it's white flowers and deep colored fruits.



may apple

May Apple Podophyllum Peltatum

This early springtime plant is native throughout the U.S. and Canada. It is found in damp forest floors, blooming in May. The fruit comes after it blooms, becoming ripe in August. It is edible but not good for eating in large quantities.



motherwort

Motherwort Leonurus Cardiaca

Motherwort, which some sources say originated in Central Asia, was brought over from Europe for use in herbal remedies, which helps give it it's name. The U.S.D.A. has this plant listed as spanning throughout the U.S. except for Northern Canada, Alaska, Florida and Hawaii.



multiflora rose

Multiflora Rose Rosa Multiflora

This lovely but very invasive plant was brought over to combat erosion and use as a natural hedge border. In it's native habitat, it can be found in the eastern parts of China, Japan and Korea. Many states have multiflora rose listed as a noxious weed because it grows over and crowds out other native plants. Unlike many of the native wild roses, it has more than a dozen hips or flowers per branch. In Michigan, it does not remain in bloom for very long, about seven to ten days.



musk thistle

Musk Thistle Carduus Nutans

Introduced in the early 1800s, this thistle is considered a noxious weed in much of the U.S. originating from Europe and part of Asia. It is not known if it came by accident or cultivated. Each showerhead shaped bloom contains around a hundred seeds, which gets disbursed by the wind. Typically Musk Thistle, a biannual, grows as a rosette the first year and shoots up and blooms the second year. It is known to bloom in a one year cycle in warmer climates.



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