Michigan Backyard Paradise



jack in the box

Jack in the Pulpit Arisaema Triphyllum

This highly variable species can be found throughout the eastern part of the U.S. It's poisonous but not deadly. The plant has been used for its medicinal properties Native Americans to treat rheumatism, bronchitis, and snakebites, as well as to induce sterility.



culivers root plant

Japanese Knotweed Fallopia Japonica

Native to Asia, this herbaceous perennial is considered a noxious weed here and in Europe. The plant spreads by very deep rhizomes and is very hard to get rid of. The World Conservation Union considers it one the world’s most invasive species. Incredible amounts of damage have been caused by it growing in cracks and messing up roads in England. Because it grows anywhere and very thickly, it often crowds out native plants.

Japanese knotweed is edible and tastes the best when the leaves just come up from the soil. It has a flavor resembling rhubarb and contains lots of vitamins. Extracts from it has been used in Chinese medicine and is increasingly being used in this country in supplements.



Japanese Lantern

Japanese Lantern Physalis Alkekengi

In the United States, Japanese Lantern is a perennial, native to Europe and Asia that is commonly cultivated in gardens. It spreads very quickly by runners and can often be hard to control. It sometimes escapes the garden and can be found growing in the wild. The attractive lanterns in the fall are why it’s planted. They are dried and used in arrangements.

The Japanese Lantern have numerous medicinal uses but are highly toxic and should be used with great care. When ripe the fruit inside the lantern can be eaten in small amounts and contain high concentrations of vitamin C.



Jewelweed

Jewelweed Impatiens Capensis

Jewelweed is an annual, native to North America found in ditches, along creeks and at the bottom edges of forest floors. Traditionally the plant has ben used for the prevention and combat of poison ivy skin rashes.



joe pye weed

Joe Pye Weed Eupatorium Maculatum

This native plant can reach up to 7 feet and blooms from July to September. Native Americans used the infused leaves as an herbal tea for rheumatism and urinary tract infections.



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