Michigan Backyard Paradise



Beach Pea

Beach Pea Lathyrus Japonicus

Beach Pea is a legume native to temperate coastal areas of Asia, Europe, North and South America. It produces pods just like any other pea you might be familiar with. They should not be eaten in large quantities because they contain a toxic amino-acid which can cause a disease of the nervous system known as 'lathyrism'.



Birdsfoot trefoil

Birdsfoot Treefoil Lotus Corniculatus

Native to Europe and North Africa, this introduction can be found on many freeways and waste areas. Often this flower gets used as a forage plant for livestock, which may have been why it was introduced. It is now considered invasisive to many areas in North America.



bitter nightshade

Bitter Nightshade Solanum Dulcamara

Native to Europe and Asia, it is considered an invaseive weed in the Great lakes region because it grows over other plants. It is poisonous to eat but has been used in herbal remedies treating a wide range of conditions.



Black Eyed Susan

Black Eyed Susan Rudbeckia Hirta

This native flower is very hearty and widely cultivated in many gardens across the state.



Blood Root

Bloodroot Sanguinaria Canadensis

Native throughout the eastern part of the U.S. and Canada, this perenial blooms in the spring. The root has a history of medicinal use by the native americans. When the root is cut, a reddish sap comes out of it and can be harmful when it comes in contact with the skin.



Bluebell

Bluebell Campanula Rotundifolia

Bluebell, in the Harebell family, is native throughout the United States. It blooms throughout spring and summer.



Birdsfoot trefoil

Blue Vervain Verbena Hastata

Native to much of the Northeast, it can be found in naturalized and disturbed areas.



Buttercup

Buttercup Ranunculus Acris

While there are many native species of buttercups in the U.S., this particular on is an introduction from Europe and Asia. Many consider it to be an invasive weed.



Butterfly Weed

Butterfly Weed Asclepias Tuberosa

This native plant of the prairie is a member of the Milkweed family and blooms from June to September. Unlike all the other milkweeds, it does not have a milky juice that comes out of it. What makes it a tough plant able to withstand harsh conditions is its taproot, which can go very deep and conserve water. In the past the root was boiled to treat Pleurisy but not a lot of evidence is shown that this was effective.



Bull thistle
Image by Walt Kauppila

Bull Thistle Cirsium Vulgare

Considered a noxious weed, it competes with native populations for water and space in wildlife areas. In pastures, cattle do not graze where it takes root. It is native to Europe and Asia.



butter and eggs

Butter and Eggs Linaria Vulgaris

Butter and eggs, in the figwort family, has the appearance similar to a snapdragon. It spreads very quickly by underground runners. Clumps of it can often be seen on the freeways. Originally it was an ornamental introduced into gardens in the U.S. but quickly became a nuisance, crowding out native plants.



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